Keynote Speakers

Nora Denzel | Sarah Granger

Nora Denzel, Retired Technical Executive

The Most Popular Ways Technical Women Shoot Themselves in the Foot in their Careers

Nora will share with you the lessons she learned along the journey from software engineer to technology executive. Using humor and personal stories, shell cover the most common ways that technical women shoot themselves in the foot in the workplace and how you can avoid making them.

Nora DenzelNora M. Denzel is a recently-retired technical executive who now serves on three public company boards. Before retiring, she spent over 25 years working in the Silicon Valley starting out as a software engineer and becoming an executive in 4 technology companies including HP and IBM.

 

Nora has been recognized many times in different technical disciplines for her contributions to the technology industry. She was named as one of the top computer storage movers and shakers’ by Computer Storage Magazine, and one of the most powerful people in computer networking by Computer Network Magazine. In 2012 she was named as one of the top 25 women engineers by Business Insider magazine and one of the top women in technology by CIO magazine.

 

You can check out Noras website at noradenzel.com or follow her on Twitter at @ndenzel.

 


Sarah Granger, Innovator in Digital Media, Online Culture, and Social Technology

Empowerment in the Digital Age

When Sarah Granger first ventured online as a tween in the 1980s in Kansas City, the Internet as we know it today didn’t exist. All she had was an Apple II+ computer, a modem, a few programming lessons, and a willingness to learn. Thirty years later, we’re surrounded by Fiberhoods, startup villages, and social apps. The technology tools may have changed, but the skills Sarah learned growing up online in KC still apply to her life and work every day in Silicon Valley. She will share the most important lessons that empowered her to become a successful technologist, entrepreneur, writer and leader and in digital media.

Sarah Granger Sarah Granger is an award-winning innovator in digital media, social technology and online culture. One of the Silicon Valley Business Journal “40 Under 40” rising stars in 2012, Sarah has also written hundreds of articles and blogs, reaching millions of readers around the world. Her work has been published in wide range of publications, including Harvard Business Review, Forbes Russia, Spectrum magazine, The Huffington Post, BlogHer and The San Francisco Chronicle at SFGate.com. In 2011, Sarah founded the Center for Technology, Media & Society to engage in a wide range of issues relating to information technology’s impact on our lives and in our world.

 

Sarah began studying computer programming as a nine year-old, growing up in Kansas City. After graduating from the University of Michigan, she moved to the San Francisco Bay Area to became a system and network security engineer at Lawrence Livermore National Lab and then Net Daemons Associates (NDA), a startup IT service provider. She later founded bComfy, an innovative online software model for ergonomics, and SFBayStyle, a pioneering online magazine. As a consultant, she has worked with dozens of companies and nonprofit organizations in six countries. She currently advises young startups, helping build the pipeline of more entrepreneurs.

 

A frequent speaker and media commentator, Sarah has been a main stage presenter at several conferences, including South by Southwest Interactive, Exceptional Women in Publishing, Tech Policy Summit, Innovation Journalism, and the first Startup Women Forum in Russia. She has been featured as a technology and social media expert on CBS News, Good Morning America, RT and NPR and quoted in The New York Times, Entrepreneur, The Washington Post, PBS.org, and The Hill. She was a contributing author of Ethical Hacking, Shift & Reset, and Diplomacy, Development and Security in the Information Age. Her first book, Your Life Online, will be published in 2014.

 

For more information, see sarahgranger.com and @sarahgranger on Twitter.